Current research

 
 
CTD Rosette at Cal Poly Pier

CTD Rosette at Cal Poly Pier

CAL POLY PIER Microbial Oceanography TIME-SERIES

Established in 2017, the goal of this time-series is to characterize the temporal variability in composition, abundance, biomass, size structure and diversity of microbial communities in a nearshore coastal upwelling ecosystem. The resources and infrastructure at the Cal Poly Pier provide the foundation for this time-series. This time-series also provides an opportunity for Cal Poly students to be trained and educated in oceanographic sampling techniques, exemplifying Cal Poly’s Learn by Doing philosophy.


DEEP-sea Microbial eukaryotes

Compared to pelagic ecosystems, deep-sea ecosystems such as methane seeps are in the early stages of exploration with regard to microbial community dynamics and diversity, especially when it comes to microbial eukaryotes. Using a combination of molecular and microscopy techniques, we work to characterize the distribution and diversity of microbial eukaryotes in relationship to geochemical and biological variables over scales ranging from centimeters to kilometers in seep sediments. Additionally, we have been working to elucidate the ecology and trophic interactions of deep sea folliculinid ciliates using stable isotopes and metagenomics.

Blue colonial tube-dwelling folliculinid ciliates living on tube-worms in deep-sea methane seep.

Blue colonial tube-dwelling folliculinid ciliates living on tube-worms in deep-sea methane seep.


Epifluorescent microscopy image of the Emiliania huxleyi virus EhV207 (capsid diameter = 200 nm)

Epifluorescent microscopy image of the Emiliania huxleyi virus EhV207 (capsid diameter = 200 nm)

Viral activity and biogeochemical cycling